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The 2020 Census Is Live!

The 2020 Census is Live!

Every ten years, the US Census Bureau counts every person living in the United States and its five territories. Read on for information about how and why to participate in the 2020 Census.

How do I submit my questionnaire?

This year you can complete your questionnaire online, by phone, or by mail (follow the links to find out more details about each method). Please note that a printed form to respond by mail will only be available after several reminders to reply via phone or online have been sent to your address. Visit my2020census.gov to submit online, or call 844-330-2020 to submit via phone (English). Language support is provided in 60 languages, as well as in braille and large print.

Who do I count?

You should count yourself at the place where you are living and sleeping most of the time as of April 1, 2020 (Census Day).

If you are filling out the census for your home, you should count everyone who is or will be living there as of April 1, 2020. This includes anyone—related or unrelated to you—who lives and sleeps at your home most of the time. Please be sure to count roommates, young children, newborns, and anyone who is renting a space in your home. If someone is staying in your home on April 1 and has no usual home elsewhere, you should count them in your response to the 2020 Census.

For special circumstances and other questions, check this page.

Why is this important?

From the official census website:

The 2020 Census will provide a snapshot of our nation—who we are, where we live, and so much more.

The results of this once-a-decade count determine the number of seats each state has in the House of Representatives. They are also used to draw congressional and state legislative districts.

Over the next decade, lawmakers, business owners, and many others will use 2020 Census data to make critical decisions. The results will show where communities need new schools, new clinics, new roads, and more services for families, older adults, and children.

The results will also inform how hundreds of billions of dollars in federal funding are allocated to more than 100 programs, including Medicaid, Head Start, block grants for community mental health services, and the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, also known as SNAP.

Census counts have a huge impact on our community. The 2020 Census data will be used to determine how more than $675 billion from more than 100 government programs are distributed to states and localities, including communities like ours. The data influence choices made about which roads are fixed, where schools are built and businesses opened, what medical services are offered and more.